rapper juice wrld breaks music charts record

Juice WRLD

Rapper Juice WRLD’s first posthumous album “Legends Never Die” is alive and well on the music charts.

The 21-track album set several records when it debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 albums chart last week. With 497,000 equivalent albums sold, based on digital sales and streams, “Legends Never Die” marks the biggest posthumous debut in 23 years since Tupac and Notorious B.I.G. posthumously released albums in 1997.

“Legends Never Die” was released July 10. Juice WRLD, born Jarad Anthony Higgins, died of an accidental overdose of oxycodone and codeine in Chicago in December.

The album also logs the biggest one-week sales for any album released this year. The album has earned the largest streaming week of 2020, and the fourth-largest streaming frame ever for an album.

Five songs from “Legends Never Die” debuted in the Top 10 of the Hot 100 chart this week, including “Come & Go” (No. 2); “Wishing Well” (No. 5); “Conversations” (No. 7); “Life’s a Mess” (No. 9); and “Hate the Other Side” (No. 10). Juice WRLD becomes just the third artist to claim five of the Top 10 slots in a single week, following Drake and The Beatles.

“The overwhelming love that millions of music fans clearly have for Jarad reminds us how much his poetic words, creativity, and bright light continues to shine throughout the world,” Juice WRLD mother, Carmela Wallace, and record label Grade A said in a statement. “This first collection of songs is a poignant reminder of his great artistic talent and emotional honesty. Music was his passion and recording gave him the outlet to share everything he was going through.”

“Legends Never Die,” the late performer’s third full-length studio album, features collaborations with Halsey, Marshmello, Trippie Redd and Polo G. He’s released several platinum-selling hits, including the Sting-sampled “Lucid Dreams,” which reached No. 2 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart in 2018.

The new album was released on Grade A and Interscope Records, giving the Universal label six of the Top 10 slots on the Hot 100 chart thanks to Juice WRLD’s success and DaBaby’s “Rockstar,” which is spending its sixth week on top.

A LAST GUEST APPEARANCE 

Shortly before his death, Juice WRLD also appeared on a song with Ellie Goulding, "Hate Me," which was released July 15 on Goulding's latest album.

“(I) was just so looking forward to having this song together that would connect me with him forever. Whenever you do a collaboration you’re connected forever. Songs are so moving and so important when you find the song you can relate to so much, or you love to dance to or the song you like to cry to. Everyone has those songs — I was just sad that he had so much more to give,” she said. “His future was so bright. Something you just can’t explain. I can’t explain that. We were all very sad. Sad for his family that came along to the video shoot with him.”

“Hate Me” reached platinum status and is on Goulding’s new album, “Brightest Blue.” The song is featured on second part of the album called “EG.0.”

Juice WRLD died of an accidental overdose of oxycodone and codeine in Chicago in December. He was 21 years old and released a batch of successful songs and albums, including the hit “Lucid Dreams,” which reached No. 2 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart. His first posthumous album, “Legends Never Die,” was released last week.

“It was just so unbelievably sad when he passed because I knew he had so much more to offer. He was full of hope and so many ideas. He was an artist,” Goulding said. “It really hit me. It made me reevaluate things a bit. I was in L.A. when I found out. I just wanted to just go home and be with my friends.”

When “Hate Me” debuted on the charts last year, Goulding set a record for most entries by any British female artist on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, besting Adele.

“I feel so like gratitude about that. Not everyone gets to have a career in America. Not everyone’s songs translate,” she said. “I never expected growing up in the situation I did. I was kind of a shy person. I just liked to write music. The idea they can reach that far and can touch that many people is pretty awesome. I hope that I can always do that.”

 

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